Toddler speech

My 20 month old has been speaking in full sentences since she was 18 months. For example: I’m hungry mommy; I need to pee; Can I have some more please? Can you hold me? What you doing Daddy? Are you okay Mommy? 

She didn’t walk until 16 months and has had a >80th percentile head circumference at all her checks. However, other development has been within average norms. We figured her speech was a bit advanced but it is even more apparent when she is around her peers or even older toddlers, with other parents often staring and commenting on her “rich vocabulary”. She had a nanny until 18 months and when she started daycare, the daycare providers said the same thing about her language. 
 

I am reaching out not to gloat but to see if anyone knows of resources or programs to expose her to. I started talking and reading early myself but my parents didn’t really have the resources to do much for me beyond reading at home (I still turned out ok and did well academically). 
 

We are not the typical intense Bay Area parents plotting her Ivy league entry from preschool, but also don’t want her to miss out on any opportunities for lack of knowing about them. Please share if you know of anything to build on this early “skill” beyond just reading more books.

Cheers
 

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RE: Toddler speech ()

I don't have any resources to recommend, but my son (19 months) is the same way, and I was also verbally advanced as a toddler. Both my husband and I were classified as "gifted" in school and had some extracurricular help, but that's a whole other topic... 

I know you've posted anonymously, but let me know if you want to have a playdate! I'd love to give my son a chance to chat with another kid his age.

RE: Toddler speech ()

My son (now 3.5) was very verbal early on. The daycare noticed it as well. One thing that could be worth trying is introducing another language, if possible. We had a Spanish-speaking nanny when he was a baby and then when the pandemic hit and we had to keep him with us at home, I spoke Spanish to him. Once he started daycare, they took over mostly on the Spanish. His Spanish comprehension is very good and his speaking ability has improved over the last year. He's now at an immersion preschool so I anticipate he'll be speaking more and more, as it's only been a month and I'm amazed at how much he's learned. He just seems to always have been more strong verbally (he's a bit uncoordinated with a ball!) so language might be easier for him to pick up. He loves the show Pocoyo, which he watches in Spanish.

RE: Toddler speech ()

You may want to consider a language immersion preschool. Sounds like she would do well with picking up a second language. 

RE: Toddler speech ()

Our kid (now college-aged) started talking before walking, was reading by age 3 and reading entire chapter books by age 4.  They engaged themselves in preschool by reading books to the other preschoolers and writing stories.  My advice for what it is worth is don't focus too much on academics. Let the child lead the way and don't overly pressure academics, as the academics will sort themselves out on their own.  If the kid is bored in school, take them out of school and let them homeschool or unschool.  Focus instead on art, music and self-directed play and out of the box stuff and your kid will be just fine.  Too much academic pressure could backfire.  Our kid ended up doing regular school until that wasn't working anymore, and then moved onto un-schooling and then an alternative school, until going off to college. 

RE: Toddler speech ()

My 21 month old is the same! I’m just enjoying our easy communication (when I see her with other similar aged babies I realize how rare and wonderful it is!) and continuing to expose her to further language, concepts, and reading. Don’t want to rush her and simply exploring the world with her at her pace. 

RE: Toddler speech ()

PS we’d be excited about a talking toddler playdate too!

RE: Toddler speech ()

As an early childhood educator, I'm going to say you absolutely don't need special resources or programs. Reading, talking, and playing with her are great, plus exposing her to peer relationships (even if those peers aren't at her language level, the social skills are important). The best way to build on this skill is to talk with her. And enjoy! Isn't it fun to hear a kid this age talk and get insight into their little brains? :-)

RE: Toddler speech ()

It could be interesting to look into the Montessori method of teaching phonics as she'd likely catch on quite quickly and show great interest with how you are describing her. I'm a Montessori teacher and have seen children spelling words and reading full sentences by three and a half with this method if they started with advanced verbal skills. If that doesn't interest you, and you allow some limited screen time, ABC mouse is a great online option that tracks your kid's progress and has curriculum starting from age 2, and there are websites like PBS kids that offer free games that enhance phonics learning as well as other subject areas. 

RE: Toddler speech ()

My now adult daughter was a very early, articulate talking toddler. It stayed with her; she has exceptional communication, leadership and social skills and was gifted academically. Just enjoy your child’s ability to communicate and consider it good fortune that she can express her feelings and needs. She doesn’t need a greater outlet at this age.  Keep talking to her and answering her questions. It sounds as if you value her inquiries and statements. That’s great. I wouldn’t make a big deal of her speaking, as others are already doing so. Remember that she’s still very young even when she makes what sounds like somewhat profound statements for her age. She may in fact be more mature than her peers but she’s still a little kid.  Give her the opportunity to explore nonverbal activities such as art, music, dance, sports, in addition to reading.  You might make a book with her about what she says with her illustrating it but I’d say keep it simple. She’s still too young for her own podcast ;).