Frozen Shoulder

Hello BPN community - Is there anyone here familiar with frozen shoulder?  I am looking for advice on treatments that worked for you.  Can you recommend a massage therapist that has knowledge of this condition? I would also love to chat with someone who knows a lot about any Nutrition recommendations.  I have already tried both chiropractic and deep tissue massage but both parties did not have any hands on knowledge of frozen shoulder.  I was diagnosed with it from a doctor and a physical therapist.

Thank you in advance for any knowledge you can share with me!

(Moderator note: here is some past advice: https://www.berkeleyparentsnetwork.org/recommend/frozen-shoulder )

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RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

I had frozen shoulder a few years ago - it's awful, I empathize with you! For me, there was no magic cure, just time. I did follow the PT exercises religiously and used ice a lot. I got one of those ice packs that are meant for shoulders. I would strap it on and wear it at work and home! It did eventually get better.

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

My Chiropractor Abby Irwin diagnosed my frozen shoulder. She helped work on it, I also did physical therapy and a lot of stretching. It took about 12 month to resolve.

I didn't know there might be a dietary connection but I'm not surprised.

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

I have found great relief from doing the Classical Stretch program, on KQED plus at 7:30 am and on KRCB at 9am. I don’t have a diagnosed frozen shoulder but at age 63 I could no longer put put my arms ( either one) around to my back to unclasp my bra! 
The gentle exercises were developed and presented by Miranda Esmond White. This 22 minute program is quick and easy and she doesn’t go into her anti-aging stuff like during the pbs fund drives. My flexibility has improved greatly and my arms and shoulders in much less pain. If you try it give it a couple of weeks of doing the exercises 4-5 times a week. I highly recommend it. Good luck.

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

I am sorry you are suffering from frozen shoulder: I also had it a couple of years ago after a shoulder injury. Your doctor has probably already told you that it will go away on its own after two years, and that is what happened to me. One day, I could just lift my arm all the way up and had no pain. I also tried to treat it aggressively, at first, with chiropractic, massage, physical therapy, exercises, etc., but after a while I realized that some of those things were actually increasing my pain. I then focused on relieving pain (CBD cream, heating pad) and waiting it out. I wish I had done that from the beginning. Good luck.

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

When I had Frozen Shoulder I tried physical therapy, but it did not help at all. I got a cortisone shot and all was better. A year later I got another cortisone shot and the problem went away again and stayed away for good. 

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

Hi, I had a very painful shoulder that was always worse when lying down.  I went to various therapists as well, but that only helped the pain for a short time and did not fix the underlying cause.  I would suggest you get an MRI done on your shoulder. My MRI showed that I had a calcification in my shoulder.  If you find that you have a calcification as well, it can be removed with guided ultrasound and lavage.  After this procedure, it took maybe a month for my shoulder to heal fully.  I then saw a PT who helped me retrain the way my shoulder worked since I had been compensating incorrectly for a long time.  No more pain now and I hope the same for you.  Good luck!

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

I had frozen shoulder a couple of years ago following an elbow dislocation. It was miserable, especially because my shoulder complicated my elbow rehab and vice versa. Physical therapy helped, but honestly it didn't help right away. The first few months of PT just felt masochistic: the exercises were very painful and I just wasn't making much progress. Then once the pain started to diminish I was able to really get to work on my range of motion. I had 3-4 months of acute pain & limitation of activities, another couple months of reduced pain, and then some lingering stiffness and adhesions for about another 8 months. I did range of motion exercises the whole time. I had one cortisone shot at the beginning that didn't help at all, then a second shot a year later that was extremely helpful. I had been starting to get symptoms of tendinitis; the cortisone got rid of that inflammation so that I could work through the last few adhesions. I considered manipulation under anesthesia, but decided against it because 1) a friend who had manipulation didn't end up with great range of motion 2) I would still have been doing PT for months and 3) my anesthesiologist neighbor said that the shoulder can make a sound like ripping velcro.

Good luck getting through this -- the pain and hassle can really wear you down at first, but it does get easier.

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

Thoughts about my own frozen shoulder/adhesive capsulitis, which plagued me for about 9 months or so several years ago:

Frozen shoulder is not a rare condition; the key in healing it appears to be patience--that, and going to someone who specializes in shoulders. A well-known and well-respected Berkeley orthopedist--not a shoulder specialist--thought I should do physical therapy through the pain. (Yeah, right, when my left shoulder's range of motion was so limited that I almost screamed with pain when I exceeded it. Mind you, his practice had its own P.T. department.) A physical therapist I really liked (Craig at LA Foot on College Avenue in Berkeley) gently worked on me a few sessions, then said he couldn't help, and recommended I see Kirk Jensen, "an excellent shoulder man."

Kirk looked me over and said not to worry and to just do a set of exercises every day at home for several months, because a frozen shoulder usually heals on its own. He gave me a sheet of stick-figure drawings; I did the exercises 5-10 minutes, morning and night, and my shoulder did feel much better after three months. The finger walk is especially effective:  https://www.sports-health.com/treatment/shoulder-injury-treatment/frozen...

Dr. Kirk Jensen, offices in Lafayette and Oakland; I imagine frozen shoulder could be checked out pretty well during a telehealth appointment.:  https://health.usnews.com/doctors/kirk-jensen-553033

RE: Frozen Shoulder ()

My sister was told the same sort of things that I read in the other comments: it will take time, you need to be patient, etc. Neither injections nor chiropractic helped, and they were painful. Then she saw someone who does osteopathic manipulation. After the first painless session, her range of motion was much improved and after a few more sessions she was almost completely over it. Unfortunately she doesn't live near here, so I can't give you a name. Good luck.